What Happens When Kids Go Cold Turkey from Their Screens for 5 Days? (Yalda Uhls)

This post appeared August 22, 2014 in the Huffington Post as did the following description of the author. Dr. Yalda T. Uhls received her PhD in developmental psychology from UCLA. She is the Regional Director of Common Sense Media, a national non-profit that focuses on helping children, families and educators navigate the digital world as well as a senior researcher at the Children’s Digital Media Center@LA, UCLA campus. Yalda’s research focuses on how older and newer media impacts the social behavior of preadolescents. Her research has been featured in the NY Times, CNN, Time Magazine, KPCC, and many other news outlets

We all stare at screens more than we would like to, and many of us rely on these tools to communicate with others, even during times when we should be spending quality time with our families and friends. So, does all this time staring at screens, which may take time away from looking at faces, change the nature of what we learn about the social world? Our study at the Children’s Digital Media Center@LA, at UCLA, asked this question. We compared two groups of approximately 50 6th grade children each over a period of five days. One group had no access to screens of any kind, while the other did.

But how does one find young people willing to give up all media for a few hours, let alone five days? We explored the ways we could guarantee that a large enough group of children would stop using media and found a simple solution. An outdoor education camp for public school children, the Pali Institute, came on as our partner. The camp director worked with us to make sure that during the five days of the camp, children had zero access to screens of any kind — no TV, no phones and no computers. This meant that the kids at the camp could only talk to other people using the form of communication our species has used for millions of years — face-to-face interaction.

Social abilities are quite complex, but an essential underlying skill is understanding emotion; children learn about emotion even before they learn language by first paying attention to a caregiver’s face. Watching faces and paying attention to the interaction of people around them provides children with essential facts for survival: who can I trust, who will love me and whom should I be scared of? We chose emotion understanding as our measure because of these early and important social learning skills.

Honestly, we were not sure that after only five days of looking at faces versus screens, anything would change. Anecdotal evidence abounds that children who stop using media become magically kind, respectful and patient, but hard data is limited. But there may be some basis for parent intuition, because we found that children’s skills in reading emotion in both faces and videotaped scenes got dramatically better. The time they spent interacting in groups, with their peers and counselors, with no devices in their hands or in front of their faces, made an important difference. The kids at camp improved their emotion understanding, while the kids who were at school did not.

So, what’s the takeaway? Should kids not look at screens anymore? Unless you want to move to Siberia — and I am only saying that figuratively, because chances are even Siberia has the Internet — I think that ship has sailed. Instead, take heart that it took only five days for kids to improve; in other words, screen time does not create irreversible damage to our children’s social skills. The rules are still the same as they always have been — create balance and device free time in your children’s lives. And when kids are small, make sure to give them many opportunities for rich in-person social interaction.

Our call to action is we must examine this question further. Before screens become the only thing we ever look at (remember the movie Wall-E?) let’s devote some resources to study the costs and benefits. The stakes are high, and our children are worth it.

 

8 Comments

Filed under technology use

8 responses to “What Happens When Kids Go Cold Turkey from Their Screens for 5 Days? (Yalda Uhls)

  1. Alice in PA

    Talk about the right read at the right time!
    My teenage daughter has lost her phone for several weeks due to misuse. I have seen an unexpected change in her. I expected a sullen teenager but instead I have a talkative, interesting, and engaging one who has rediscovered some interests that got put aside when the phone took over her life.
    Yes this is purely anecdotal.
    However like many districts, mine is looking at some type of one-to-one program. And like many districts, we are rushing ahead without giving any thought whatsoever to whether increasing screen time is a good idea. I feel we are joining on the bandwagon that says anything on the computer is better than anything that we are doing now. No one seems to even acknowledge that the research on the benefits of one to one computers is still nascent. And like everything in education it is very context dependent.

  2. David

    Hi Larry,
    I’m reading the Pope’s new encyclical–he has a lot to say about technology…enough that it would be worth your time to take a look: http://w2.vatican.va/content/francesco/en/encyclicals/documents/papa-francesco_20150524_enciclica-laudato-si.html

    I just read this which fits in with your post above:

    “The idea of promoting a different cultural paradigm and employing technology as a mere instrument is nowadays inconceivable. The technological paradigm has become so dominant that it would be difficult to do without its resources and even more difficult to utilize them without being dominated by their internal logic. It has become countercultural to choose a lifestyle whose goals are even partly independent of technology, of its costs and its power to globalize and make us all the same. Technology tends to absorb everything into its ironclad logic, and those who are surrounded with technology “know full well that it moves forward in the final analysis neither for profit nor for the well-being of the human race”, that “in the most radical sense of the term power is its motive – a lordship over all” [quoting Romano Guardini, The End of the Modern World]. As a result, “man seizes hold of the naked elements of both nature and human nature” [Guardini]. Our capacity to make decisions, a more genuine freedom and the space for each one’s alternative creativity are diminished.”

  3. Thank you Larry for reposting this and sharing it with your readers! Yalda

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